The Sad Truth About the Funeral Procession House Pass

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The Sad Truth About the Funeral Procession House Pass

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The Sad Truth About the Funeral Procession House Pass

On February 27, 2017 in the ICU of the hospital, my father cries out, " I just want to go home..." .

The sounds of alarms, the blinking, buzzing and beeping, doctor after doctor and the spinning of our heads questioning how this would turn out.  These moments were very painful, mostly for my father.  Many have heard how difficult it can be facing these circumstances, yet still this may sound all to familiar to anyone who has had this or a similar experience.

The day started as any other, yet somehow now my fathers life is in the hands of the trauma team after a very serious motor vehicle accident.  An accident that I'm told had I been driving I would have never survived due to the height difference between my father and I.  "We are going to get you home Dad." I said.

Hearing my fathers cry I am reminded why we pause at the home during a funeral.  I know now how impossible it would have been to not to answer his cry with assurance.  Knowing full well that regardless of how this nightmare would end how important it would be to keep my word to him.

Despite all of this I battle with myself considering how often these moments are forgotten or overlooked while planning a funeral.  That this old tradition may be skipped for the sake of simplicity and practicality.  The house pass is often rationalized away as unsafe or without merit even before it is offered.

In satisfying this promise there is an honor, a respect given.  A final opportunity to treat the departed as the person they are and not just a memory.  What we choose for those we love who have gone before us will impact our future well being.

I am forever grateful to all those who cared for my father, that although speaking premature, it is expected he will be returned home well to the care of our family.

As funeral professionals not only must there be understanding of what we offer to be truly considered; We must also be able to communicate the purpose to those we serve.